Monday, August 29, 2011

YouTube Video of My Day

Wow. 
I love what Harry Potter has done in the world. Don't you? 



I hope this brightened your day as much as it brightened mine! :) 

Saturday, August 20, 2011

YouTube Video of My Day

This was definitely a "Double-take" type of song.
To be very honest, I first heard it at the beginning of a recent episode of Covert Affairs.

It's just so soothing with an uplifting beat. 




We Are the Tide by Blind Pilot 
The Lyrics

Our time was ever on the road, the riders is in what we make,
Oh to hear, to hear of how in this give and take,
But hear it this way, hear it this way, alright.

The war is our hearts and lovers in the band we love,
We keep breaking our backs, hoping that it gives enough,
Oh, what do you need, what do you need,

Oh man there’s ladders to the sky, building up a high rise,
Oh man we won’t last long but we’re giving it our best try,
Don’t you know you’re alive, you know you’re alive,
None of us save the day, the war it told you.

Too mad, I’m in love with everybody on the city bus,
Feel the push and pull, hoping that it doesn’t mean much.
Oh what do you see, what do you see,

And everybody on the street is singing like it’s Sunday,
So we keep inside and you look steady at me.
Ah... Ah....

And we don’t know what left, but we feel it’s coming back soon,
So we’re standing in the street staring at a blood red moon,
We are the tide,
We are the tide,
And none of us save the day, the war it told you.


What do you think about it? Are you a fan of this type of music? 

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

YouTube Video of My Day

Sometimes it's as simple as just opening your heart.




This song has been stuck in my head this week.
I think it's beautiful.
What do you think?

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

TV Talk: Law Edition

Being home from college really means one big and major thing:
There will be a lot of useless TV-watching with the family as the evening lingers on.
That one big and major thing has many implications:
1. For the easily obsessed of us, it means that summer holds the auditions for new TV commitments.
2. It means that those cut from the team get a pretty bad review in comparison to the raves of the newly found loves [pretty bad: not much raving].
3. A lot of Law & Order re-runs.


After my obsession with Charmed, my mother and I began to watch CSI
One thing led to another and we had started to watch CSI: NY, CSI: Miami & even Crossing Jordan. 
The one show I thought I'd never watch was Law & Order.
The "bum BUM" sound kinda freaked me out.
Then, enter Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.
Now, THAT was cool.
I soon grew to love the "bum BUM" sound.


As I'm looking into law school, it seems like TV is being taken over by law shows.
Here are the three that I've watched, in order from not interested to favorite!


Although Kathy Bates and Brittany Snow make for a great combination, unfortunately Harry's Law  paled in comparison to the next couple of law shows that I was following.



Franklin and Bash, known to some as F&B.
Dude, forget the law part for a second. 
Breckin Meyer and John-Paul Gosselaar are hilarious individually but together...
let's just say, my lol's in real life have never proven so true.
Plus, they even tweet funny! & often about the show & each other.
Yes, the law part is insane; but why not?
Go with it. Go with the Hollywood suck-y suspension of disbelief and enjoy it.
To top it off, I love that it's set in Los Angeles and I love love that intro!


My favorite law show as of now is hands-down Suits.

It's slightly more realistic law-wise than F&B but I, for one, definitely feel the gut-wrenching stress that Mike feels whenever Harvey asks him to do something with no guidance whatsoever.
The perfectionists in the room, holla!
Also, the lawyer to fake lawyer dynamic poses some very interesting ethical questions that would do us all good to analyze[Okay, might be a pretense to defend the show].
Plus, everyone knows Rick Hoffman's character is going to be funny and conniving.
The characters are complex and intelligent which makes for some great pop culture references and witty comebacks. :) Enjoy!


Do your TV habits change during summer?
What do you think of the new face of lawyers on television?

Friday, August 5, 2011

Across Cultures.

I finally watched Burlesque last night.
It was cheesy but I'm a sucker for music in movies and anything remotely cheesy.
Admittedly, it did both me just a tad that there were some songs that you would NEVER hear at a Burlesque show that Cher and Christina Aguilera sang and "rehearsed". 
I had no idea so many celebrities were a part of the movie: Julianne Hough [Dancing With the Stars], Eric Dane [Grey's Anatomy], Kristen Bell [When In RomeForgetting Sarah Marshall, Veronica Mars ], Stanley Tucci, Dianna Agron [Glee], Cam Gigandet [Twilight], and even Peter Gallagher [Covert Affairs] . 
Here's the trailer.


As I watched and watched, 
there was something that kept tugging at my memory.
It was a music video I had seen when I was in Lebanon.
It was a collaboration between Sabah [also known as Sabou7a] and Rola.
Please note the similarities between the music video and the Burlesque trailer. 
Even if you don't understand the words, the body language and imagery makes the plot line pretty clear.


Seems like small-town women all around the world dream of fame and musical careers...
oh, and plastic surgery.

In case you all were wondering what happened after that first video, here's the sequel:

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Bonding with Jane: My Journey

Ahh, yes! 
Sense of achievement despite a long list of other to-do's: check!
I finally finished reading the mere 175 pages of Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen. 

I have had a longtime connection with Jane Austen but this is the first time I've finally gotten to finish a novel of hers.
I'm pretty sure it all started with The Jane Austen Book Club which intrigued my fancy by the parallels of the lives of the movie's characters and those of Jane Austen's books (so I recorded it to the DVR & added it to my "I should really get around to watching that" list).
After that, I resolved to read all the books so I would get the in's and out's of the comparisons.
Before I managed to pick up any of the books, I watched Sense and Sensibility, the movie starring Kate Winslet [Mildred PierceTitanic] as Marianne, Emma Thompson [Nanny McPhee, Love Actually, Harry Potter series] as Elinor, Alan Rickman [Love Actually, Harry Potter series as Snape]as Colonel Christpoher Brandon, and Hugh Grant [Did You Hear About the Morgans?, Music and Lyrics, About a Boy,] as Edward Farrars. 
That was a really great film with absolutely fantastic cinematography.
Even the trailer gives me chills.


Then, to further set me off from reading the book, I watched Becoming Jane with Anne Hathaway [The Princess Diaries,Love & Other Drugs] and James McAvoy [Wanted, AtonementX-Men: First Class]. 

At this point, I looked up to Jane Austen in a kind of weird way. 
I already had The Works of Jane Austen with four of her novels.
All I needed to do was read. 
So, eventually, I did. 


The thing with Jane Austen's writing is that the words truly do portray her real world.
Her flow is so like poetic and beautiful.
The emotions she explains to us are common today but never expressed so eloquently.
The timelessness of certain types of relationships stands, not limited by neither geography or time.


Finally, I've finished Sense and Sensibility.
Here are some ideas that stick with me: 
1. Although I usually understand where Elinor is coming from, 
sometimes I feel just as Marianne, 
"with a heart hardened against their merits, and a temper irritated by their very attention"
and sometimes that feeling is hard to shake but I've never seen or heard it so well put. 
2. The type of astonishment that leads to being "happily disposed as is the human mind to be easily familiarised with any change for the better, it required several hours to give sedateness to her spirits, or any degree of tranquility to her heart".
3. The words of Mrs. Jennings"Nothing in the way of pleasure can ever be given up by the young men of this age".


 Now, I'm working on finishing up Maya Angelou's Letter to My Daughter.
Have you ever read any Jane Austen? What are you reading now?
Have you watched any of these movies?

Monday, August 1, 2011

Chicago ... & all that jazz.

With a new month flattering us with its arrival,
I find that I've been procrastinating writing a certain blog post.
Not necessarily for a slacker reason either, but because I want to be sure to do it justice 
[& I took too many pictures and narrowing it down to just a couple might take years]. 
Okay, maybe it is a slacker reason. 

As you may or may not know, 
I was lucky enough to be chosen to be a part of the delegation from Loyola Marymount University sent to the National Jesuit Student Leadership Conference (NJSLC) in Chicago. 
Regardless of one's own religion and spirituality, it's hard to deny the merit of Jesuit-based education, and we were lucky enough to be allowed to choose our own path of learning and leadership [i.e. don't let politics/religion get in the way of letting things touch you].


Conference theme? Clearly, "Go forth and set the world on fire!"; a personal favorite quote by St. Ignatius.
A couple of terms you might be curious about: 
Cura Personalis, treating people as individuals and honoring their unique worth, &
Magis, the spirit of generous excellence - striving for the greater good. 
Loyola University Chicago did a truly phenomenal job in welcoming all 25 Jesuit schools present at the conference.  
Our greeting committee!
A) Twitter hashtag: awesome
B) Genius idea of a display!
The second day, we met up in our randomly assigned "Small Groups" and talked about identity. 
That's always an interesting topic for me because I'm definitely the type of person to automatically ask "where are you from?" but the real question is "where do you come from that makes you who you are today?" The latter is just slightly creepier than the abridged version.
Our View from Small Group Discussion
What I really wanted to share with you was the reflective nature of the workshops. Some awesome stuff was discussed, so awesome I felt compelled to take notes...during summer. 
No, but really, seriously, I took real notes too.
Workshop One: Increasing Awareness and Engagement through Mindfulness
Weird, but it made me question my love for raisins. 
We practiced "mindfulness," defined by Jon Kabat-Zinn as 
"moment to moment non-judgmental awareness cultivated by paying attention".
There are actual benefits to this other than the stereotyped "love of the world" hippie-esque peace of mind. Just look at #5 in this business article from CBS.
We even got a paper full of resources so that we can host our own mindfulness exercises to share with our student body. E-mail me if you are interested in these links!


Workshop Two: A Win-Win: How to Handle Sticky Work-Place Situations Professionally
The big aha! moment of this workshop was when Kathryn Jackson asked us to think about our "enemies" and what it was about them that was similar to us. 
Uh-Oh.
A great quote  that stays with me is "If you can't get out of it, get into it" && another, "begin with end in mind". It's a lot easier to have a pet peeves peer bonding at the beginning of a project than be annoyed for a length of time and see only the bad in people. 


Workshop Three: The Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership
Two main points: 
1. "You become more powerful the more you give it away"
2. "Listening is the most important communicative skill"


That afternoon was reserved for sightseeing.
This is me in front of the Chicago River :) 
Skip some stuff so this is not a book rather than a post.
Day Three included my personal favorite keynote speech from Art Munin
Workshop Six: Using YOUR Passions to Change the World!
Lauren Shwer did an amazing job at telling her story and encouraging us to embrace our stories, not that we hadn't prior to that. But sometimes it's easier to separate these types of sessions with our own personal backgrounds; sometimes out of necessity [if there is a big group, not everyone can speak in detail] or out of complexity [can you summarize your life in 10 minutes? not even close]. 
The question that we need to constantly ask ourselves is "What have my hands done?" 
That was really touching because, compared to what we wish that they would do, what they have done must not be much, you know?

NJSLC was a great experience, and I feel like I've truly gained through my participation. 
It even encouraged me to write my post about Fair Trade.
That's all about my summer trip to lovely Chicago, aka The Windy City aka Chi-Town.